How to Cook Ogbono Soup with Egusi – A Recipe to Try

If you have ever imagined eating two beloved Nigerian soups in one meal, you’ll love the Ogbono soup with Egusi combination. 

Explorative Nigerians who have tried the Ogbono soup and Egusi combo will agree that it is one you never really expect to slap, but it does. 

The Ogbono and Egusi combo is delicious and has a thick slimy texture that pairs perfectly with any swallow of choice. 

Nigerian cuisine is rich and diverse, and Ogbono Soup and Egusi Soup are two of the most popular soups in the country. Ogbono Soup, also known as Draw Soup, is a thick and hearty soup made with Ogbono seeds, which are the seeds of the wild mango tree. Egusi Soup, on the other hand, is made with ground melon seeds and is typically mixed with vegetables, meat or fish. Both soups are considered staples in Nigerian households and are often served with fufu or pounded yam, which are traditional Nigerian starchy foods.

Learning how to cook Ogbono Soup with Egusi is a valuable skill for anyone interested in Nigerian cuisine. Not only are these soups delicious and nutritious, but they also offer a unique and authentic taste of Nigerian culture. This article will provide a step-by-step guide on how to cook Ogbono Soup with Egusi, highlighting the necessary ingredients, preparation techniques, cooking instructions, and serving suggestions.

The best part of this combo soup is that it is straightforward to cook. We will teach you how to use Ogbono soup and Egusi combo recipes.

How to Cook Ogbono Soup with Egusi – Recipes you’ll love 

The best part of most meals is eating them, and the second-best part is preparing them. We believe Ogbono soup and Egusi combo is one such food. 

We’ve outlined two recipes below to help you easily cook Ogbono soup and Egusi. But, of course, you can also tweak the recipes to suit your preference, like the choice of protein, etc. 

Time to dust your cooking apron and chef’s hat!

How to Cook Ogbono Soup with Egusi

Recipe by Luong TanCourse: MainCuisine: African CuisineDifficulty: Medium
Servings

5

servings
Prep time

30

minutes
Cooking time

40

minutes
Calories

370

kcal

This recipe helps you easily cook Ogbono soup and Egusi. But, of course, you can also tweak the recipes to suit your preference, like the choice of protein, etc. 

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup of Ogbono (preferably grounded). If not, grind the seeds in a grinder

  • 1 cup of chopped bitter leaves, pumpkin leaves (Ugwu), or spinach

  • ½ cup of crayfish (blended)

  • 2 pounds of meat or fish(boiled)

  • Smoked fish and stock fish

  • 2 hot peppers (blended)

  • 2 beef-flavored seasoning cubes

  • 1 crayfish-flavored seasoning cube

  • Salt

  • 1 cup of palm oil

  • 2 cups of Egusi seeds

Directions

  • If your vegetables are dried, soak them in water until they are hydrated enough.
  • Separate your boiled meat or fish from the stock and divide the stock into two. Add half of the stock to a pot and cover the other half in an airtight bowl.
  • Blend the Egusi seeds in a grinder until they form grainy particles.
  • Place the pot of meat or fish stock over medium heat and leave to boil.
  • Add ¼ a cup of water to the ground Egusi and mix it into a thick paste.
  • Scoop the Egusi pastes into the boiling stock and leave to cook for 5 minutes while you begin prepping your Ogbono.
  • To your ground Ogbono, add the other half of the meat or fish stock and mix it into a paste. Pour the Ogbono paste into the boiling Egusi and allow them to cook for about 2 minutes. Follow with the crayfish, seasoning cubes, and pepper.
  • Add water if the soup is too thick, and taste it for too much salt. Add the palm oil and let it cook in the soup for about 30 seconds, then follow with your meat and fish. Leave to cook for two minutes. Add your vegetables and simmer on low heat for about 1 minute.
  • Voila! Your Ogbono soup and Egusi combo is ready to be served with any swallow of choice.

Recipe Video

Recipe 2

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 40 minutes 

Total time: 60 minutes

Servings: Between 3 and 4

Ingredients

  • 1 handful of Ogbono seeds or 2 handfuls of Ogbono powder
  • 3 cooking spoons of palm oil
  • Spinach, Ugwu (a.k.a pumpkin leaf), or Onugbu (a.k.a bitter leaf)
  • 1 cup of ground Egusi seeds
  • ½ cup of crayfish 
  • 1 medium-sized onion 
  • Chili or scotch bonnet pepper (blended)
  • Assorted Meat and Fish: beef, cow foot, Shaki (a.k.a tripe), Ponmo (a.k.a cow skin), dry fish, and stock fish
  • 2 seasoning cubes
  • Salt 

Preparation

  1. If you are using Ogbono and Egusi seeds, grind them thoroughly using a dry mill or blender. Then, transfer each to separate bowls and add some lukewarm water. Mix well to form a paste.
  2. Wash, season, and cook the meat, dry fish, and stock fish. Add onions, stock cubes, and salt to bring out the taste. Cook the meat until soft. 
  3. Slice the vegetables thinly, grind the pepper and crayfish and place them aside.
  4. Heat a cooking spoonful of palm oil in a small pot until it heats up. Fry the Egusi paste in the heated oil and stir until it thickens. Keep frying the Egusi for about 15 minutes or when the oil sits above the Egusi. Turn off the heat and set the Egusi aside. 
  5. Heat the leftover palm oil until it is hot. Lower the heat and add the ground Ogbono, stirring constantly. Pour in some water or meat stock, and allow it to boil for about a minute. 
  6. Add the Egusi from step 4 to the pot and mix well. Pour in some of the meat stock or water if it is too thick and allow it to cook for 10 minutes. Stir the soup consistently to prevent it from burning. 
  7. Add the dry fish, stock fish, meat, crayfish, stock cube, pepper, and salt. Combine well and simmer for about 10 minutes with the pot covered. Keep stirring to avoid burning. 
  8. Throw in the vegetables. Simmer for 3 minutes before removing the soup from the heat. Stir and serve hot with any swallow of choice. 

Serving

Ogbono Soup with Egusi is best served with fufu or pounded yam, which are traditional Nigerian starchy foods. Fufu is made from cassava or yam flour, while pounded yam is made from boiled yam, which is then pounded until it becomes smooth and stretchy. These starchy foods provide a perfect accompaniment to the thick and hearty Ogbono Soup with Egusi, allowing you to enjoy the full flavor of the soup.

When it comes to storing leftover soup, it is best to allow the soup to cool down before storing it in an airtight container in the refrigerator. This will help to keep the soup fresh for a longer period of time. When reheating leftover soup, it is recommended to add a little water or stock to the soup to help loosen it up. It is also important to stir the soup as it reheats to prevent clumps from forming.

In terms of personalization, there are many variations of Ogbono Soup with Egusi that you can try. For example, you can add different types of meat or fish to the soup, or you can vary the vegetables used. Some people like to add okra or bitter leaf to the soup for added flavor and nutrition. You can also adjust the level of spiciness by adding more or less pepper, depending on your taste preferences.

What is egusi soup made of?

Egusi soup is a popular soup in Nigerian cuisine, especially among the Yoruba and Igbo tribes. It is made with ground egusi seeds (melon seeds) as the primary ingredient. Other common ingredients include leafy vegetables such as spinach or bitter leaf, meat (beef, chicken, or goat), fish (dried or fresh), onions, tomatoes, pepper, and other seasonings such as crayfish and stock cubes. Some variations of the recipe may also include additional ingredients such as okra or pumpkin leaves. Egusi soup is typically thick and hearty, and often served with fufu or pounded yam.

What makes Ogbono soup bitter?

Ogbono soup is not traditionally bitter, but rather has a slightly sweet and nutty flavor. The bitterness in Ogbono soup can come from using unripe or overripe Ogbono seeds. It is important to use ripe Ogbono seeds that have a dark brown or black color and a slightly soft texture. If unripe or overripe seeds are used, they can impart a bitter taste to the soup. Additionally, the soup may become bitter if the seeds are burnt or toasted for too long. It is important to properly toast the seeds until they are lightly browned, but not burnt. Using fresh ingredients and proper cooking techniques can help to prevent bitterness in Ogbono soup and ensure a delicious and satisfying meal.

Is Nigerian Egusi soup healthy?

Egusi soup can sometimes become slimy due to the presence of okra, which is a common ingredient in the soup. Okra contains a high amount of mucilage, which is a sticky substance that can make the soup slimy. To prevent the soup from becoming too slimy, some people prefer to leave out the okra altogether or to use less of it.

Another factor that can contribute to sliminess in Egusi soup is the method of preparation. If the soup is not cooked for long enough, or if it is not stirred enough during cooking, it can become slimy. Additionally, if too much water is added to the soup, it can become thin and slimy.

To reduce the sliminess in Egusi soup, some people recommend adding a small amount of ground crayfish or baking soda to the soup while cooking. These ingredients can help to break down the mucilage and reduce the sliminess of the soup. However, it is important to note that adding too much of these ingredients can alter the taste of the soup.

Overall, Egusi soup can become slimy due to the presence of okra and the method of preparation. By using fresh ingredients, proper cooking techniques, and adjusting the amount of okra used, you can achieve a delicious and satisfying Egusi soup without excessive sliminess.

Why is Egusi soup slimy?

Ogbono soup is not traditionally bitter, but rather has a slightly sweet and nutty flavor. The bitterness in Ogbono soup can come from using unripe or overripe Ogbono seeds. It is important to use ripe Ogbono seeds that have a dark brown or black color and a slightly soft texture. If unripe or overripe seeds are used, they can impart a bitter taste to the soup. Additionally, the soup may become bitter if the seeds are burnt or toasted for too long. It is important to properly toast the seeds until they are lightly browned, but not burnt. Using fresh ingredients and proper cooking techniques can help to prevent bitterness in Ogbono soup and ensure a delicious and satisfying meal.

10 Foods You Can Eat with Ogbono and Egusi

Ogbono and Egusi are great but even better when paired with the right side dishes. 

Here are 10 foods you can eat with Egusi and Ogbono: 

  1. Eba
  2. Fufu
  3. Pounded yam
  4. Amala
  5. Semolina
  6. Plantain flour (made into swallow) 
  7. Mixed grain flour (made into swallow)
  8. Boiled white rice
  9. Pasta
  10. Wheat flour (made into swallow)
By Luong Tan

Luong Tan, the creative and passionate founder of Bourbono, is a multi-talented individual with a deep love for the culinary arts. An accomplished food blogger, cookbook author, and former Ambassador of US cuisine in Vietnam (2015-2016), Luong has been on a mission to share his appreciation for food with the world.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Related Posts